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From an employer’s perspective the firing of an employee is hopefully the culmination of a deliberative process and compliance with the company’s policies and procedures.  It is the ultimate adverse employment action and everything that is said and done may be put under the microscope by an employee’s lawyer, EEOC, or Texas Commission on

Filing a charge of discrimination with the EEOC is not difficult for a motivated former employee.  A lawyer is not necessary and there is enough instruction from the EEOC and the world wide web to give someone pretty detailed guidance on what to do.  Once the complaint is filed the EEOC (or similar state

Capture

A few weeks ago Washington Quarterback Robert Griffin III left the Washington lockeroom for what all believe was the last time.  RG3, a Heisman winner at Baylor, will likely be cut.  It was only a couple of seasons ago that Washington fans believed he was their football saivor as he led them to a division

https://www.scribd.com/doc/292539143/Sarkisian-lawsuit

A few weeks ago we discussed the firing of former USC football coach Steve Sarkisian.  Since then Sarkisan has filed his own lawsuit in California state court.  Deadspin has a great breakdown of the lawsuit and the lawsuit itself.  Sarkisian asserts he is an alcholic and USC failed to work with him with

There is a good article from the Houston Chronicle this week outlining a non-compete dispute between two former compensation consultants and their former employer.  The facts are pretty standard fare for this type of dispute:

  • professionals have some type of non-compete agreement with former employer;
  • former employer finds out professionals are leaving in violation

                        

A few weeks ago we discussed a Texas employer hiring new employees based upon their Body Mass Index.  The dangers of considering weight in employment decisions were recently exemplified in a press release from the EEOC. 

In that release, it was announced that a treatment facility for chemically dependent women and children was paying $125,000 to