white hatThe details are slim from a recent article from the New York Post about a $3 million dollar non-compete/breach of contract case against a New York City hair stylist.  What we know:

  • Stylist Annie Rush worked at the salon for 6 years;
  • Apparently she is alleged to have signed a 1 year non-compete (that is

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A few months ago I confronted another FaceBook related case where we were arguing over what level of FaceBook activity constituted a solicitation in violation of a non-solicitation covenant.  I’ve previously discussed this issue and given the sage advice that you’ll know it when you see it.  I’m not so sure that’s such sage advice

          

Just a few random thoughts on Non-Compete/Non-Solicit TROs after some recent experiences:

  1. Hopefully the other side is represented by counsel – Despite popular belief the ex parte TRO is in many instances much harder to get than one where the other side is represented by counsel. It’s just easier when

                         

At the end of each year I try to address and take inventory of what has occurred in post-employment covenant litigation in the State of Texas.  After several years of dramatic Texas Supreme Court opinions on the subject of non-competes, 2012 was a quiet year.  We heard nothing from the Texas Supreme Court on

                                  

Medical device manufacture, Synthes Medical Company, has filed a number of lawsuits against former employees alleged to have violated non-compete and non-solicitation agreements.  The lawsuits illustrate the rise of litigation within the medical world over non-competes. 

Synthes,